Colorado

A plan for medical marijuana



By State Sen. Chris Romer, and State Rep. Tom Massey, 12/11/2009 Marijuana. Most people see it as a recreational drug and are skeptical of its tangible, medical benefits for patients with chronic pain, including those whose use of prescribed narcotics often leaves them vulnerable to addiction.

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How to regulate medical marijuana



By The Daily Sentinel Thursday, December 10, 2009 State Sen. Chris Romer, a Denver Democrat, has assumed a daunting task. He’s trying to figure out a means to regulate what appears to be Colorado’s fastest-growing business right now: medical marijuana. We applaud him for doing so. It’s an industry that has blossomed rapidly this year, thanks to a state court ruling and a federal decision on law enforcement. And there is virtually nothing that says who may dispense medical marijuana or under what circumstances they may do so.

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Marijuana Dispensary in Washington County



Jo Anne Busing 12/10/2009 Washington County, and more specifically, Akron, has been home to a medical marijuana dispensary since June. "The owner has all the necessary permits from the state to operate the dispensary," Sheriff Larry Kuntz said.

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Second medical-marijuana clinic to open



Ann E. Wibbenmeyer 12/10/2009 Nature's Spirit, a wellness clinic, will be having its grand opening on Dec. 12, providing massage, acupuncture and services from a visiting physician who can make recommendations for patients with a medical need for marijuana. This business, located in the first block of East 7th Street, received a conditional-use permit from city council last month to begin operations.

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Weed picking



Betsy Marston 11/10/2009 Who knew marijuana was the answer to the real estate industry’s prayers? It must be so, since the Denver Post announced in a giant headline: “Pot boom offsets real estate bust.” Voters first approved a medical marijuana amendment to the Colorado Constitution back in 2000, but the feds announced only recently that they wouldn’t prosecute medical users. In the meantime, some 13,000 people have gone on record as suffering from one or more of eight conditions that make the herb necessary for their health.

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